Tamar Shakin Pardo


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Tamar Shakin Pardo

Tamar Shakin Pardo engages in erasure and etching in her works Partly Cloudy, and Night (2008-9). Embarking on a quest tracing her private biography, for many years she has been gathering drawings of outlines sketched around images in documentary photographs. She stratifies these meaningless lines one atop the other to create a cyclical, sonar network intended to absorb states of consciousness and emotional conditions through sensitive vibration. The result is somewhat reminiscent of Anna Ticho's reticulated drawing touches. In her work presented in the exhibition (Jerusalem Landscape, 1960), Ticho went out to the landscape and cross-hatched, with thousands of tiny strokes, the grass in the field moving in the evening breeze. Shakin's hatchings, unlike Ticho's, do not unite to form a definite landscape image, yet something about the rhythmical quality and tonality of the works links the two women over the distance of generations.
Through the etching technique Shakin was able to lend the vibrating lines an added dimension of random, dynamic patchiness. The struggle between rigid line and a soft, expanding stain calls to mind Moshe Kupferman's process of "daubing-erasure", an important influence on Shakin. The lines, constructed and erased in a continuous Sisyphean process, create "scaffolding," which holds her near-collapsing structures. As in Kupferman's work, here too, there is more than meets the eye, alluding to the experience of reduction and survival under minimal conditions. The obsessive ritual continually reconstructs the traces of trauma, which generates a disturbing, stringent, visual "sound" that never falls silent.